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  • ACGM.ENGL.1301 - Composition I
1, 2, 3 Write!
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CC BY-NC-SA
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1, 2, 3 Write! provides step-by-step instruction to build college writing skills. It combines comprehensive grammar and mechanics review with sentence, paragraph and essay writing techniques and practice. Links to example essays from professional and student writers demonstrate the skills studied and provide reading and critical thinking opportunities.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MHCC Library OER Press
Author:
Gay Monteverde
Date Added:
03/13/2021
Activating the Schemata [Resource]
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CC BY
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Instructors engaging with the following resource will discover a variety of pre-reading strategies for enhancing their students’ reading comprehension. The resource emphasizes the importance of activating students’ schemata, or prior learning, as a foundation for comprehending new material. Techniques like guided anticipation utilize thought-provoking yes/no statements to initiate conceptual learning, while cloze exercises actively engage students with filling in missing words based on their existing vocabulary. “Writing in the Round” is presented as a collaborative activity fostering an exchange of diverse views, while free writing encourages students to draw upon their memory for a creative exploration of related concepts. By the end of this resource, instructors will discover adaptable strategies applicable to various grade levels and subject areas, providing a comprehensive toolkit for promoting active reading and comprehension among their students.

Author: Sharon Haigler
Editor: Mary Landry, C. Anneke Snyder
Supervisor: Terri Pantuso

Subject:
English Language Arts
English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL/ESL)
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading of Informational Text
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Student Success: Faculty/staff-facing
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
C. Anneke Snyder
Mary Landry
Sharon Haigler
Terri Pantuso
Date Added:
05/28/2024
Annotated Bibliography [Assignment/Rubric]
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CC BY
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Upon successful completion of this assignment, students will
- analyze five sources that reflect a supporting or opposing stance on the student’s chosen topic.
- create an annotated bibliography that follows the conventions of the genre, such as following APA formatting guidelines, summarizing sources, evaluating source credibility, and explaining the relevance of each source to the research argument.

Author: Kimberly Stelly
Editor: Mary Landry, C. Anneke Snyder
Supervisor: Terri Pantuso

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
C. Anneke Snyder
Kimberly Stelly
Mary Landry
Terri Pantuso
Date Added:
05/29/2024
Annotating Texts: Developing an Evaluative Essay [Assignment/Rubric]
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CC BY
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Upon successful completion of this assignment, students will
- analyze the concepts of “segregated coexistence” and “living in community” as proposed by Nicholas Ensley Mitchell in order to evaluate the situations described in the provided articles regarding food security, gentrification, and urban development.
- use Mitchell’s framework to evaluate the quality of diversity in their local college or community context.

Author: Christopher Manes
Editor: Mary Landry, C. Anneke Snyder
Supervisor: Terri Pantuso

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Author:
C. Anneke Snyder
Christopher Manes
Mary Landry
Terri Pantuso
Date Added:
05/28/2024
Classical Argument Essay [Lesson/Rubric]
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CC BY
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Upon successful completion of this assignment, students will
- create a persuasive classical argument following the Aristotelian structure, including an introduction, narration, confirmation, counterargument/refutation/concession, and conclusion.

Author: Kimberly Stelly
Editor: Mary Landry, C. Anneke Snyder
Supervisor: Terri Pantuso

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Author:
C. Anneke Snyder
Kimberly Stelly
Mary Landry
Terri Pantuso
Date Added:
05/29/2024
Commas and Coordinating Conjunctions [Lesson]
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CC BY
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Upon successful completion of this lesson, students will
- analyze example sentences to determine whether a comma is needed before the coordinating conjunction based on the presence of independent clauses.

Author: Nicole Hagstrom-Schmidt
Editor: Mary Landry, C. Anneke Snyder
Supervisor: Terri Pantuso

Subject:
English Language Arts
Grammar
Material Type:
Lesson
Student Guide
Author:
C. Anneke Snyder
Mary Landry
Nicole Hagstrom-Schmidt
Terri Pantuso
Date Added:
05/29/2024
Contextual Analysis Research Unit [Resource]
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CC BY
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This resource models a possible research unit for instructors interested in guiding students through contextual literary analysis. As such, this resource outlines strategies for delving into the biographical, historical, and cultural contexts of recommended mentor texts, such as ‘The Yellow Wallpaper’ by Charlotte Perkins Gilman and ‘Hills Like White Elephants’ by Ernest Hemingway. Additionally, this resource provides a suggested pacing for the unit as well as an outline and rubric for crafting and evaluating the final essay. By the end of this section, instructors will be equipped to design their own contextual analysis research unit that suits their class interests and needs.

Author: Katherine Yoerg
Editor: Mary Landry, C. Anneke Snyder
Supervisor: Terri Pantuso

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Language, Philosophy, and Culture
Literature
Reading of Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
C. Anneke Snyder
Katherine Yoerg
Mary Landry
Terri Pantuso
Date Added:
05/29/2024
Definition Essay [Assignment/Rubric]
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CC BY
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Upon successful completion of this assignment, students will
- analyze a chosen concept through various strategies, such as its connotations, denotations, and more.
- create a well-organized essay that explains and defends a proposed definition for their chosen concept through reasoning strategies, evidence, and credible sources.

Author: Kimberly Stelly
Editor: Mary Landry, C. Anneke Snyder
Supervisor: Terri Pantuso

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
C. Anneke Snyder
Kimberly Stelly
Mary Landry
Terri Pantuso
Date Added:
05/28/2024
Description Essay [Assignment/Rubric]
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CC BY
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Upon successful completion of this assignment, students will
- create a well-organized essay that describes in vivid detail a significant person, place, event, moment, or object that has impacted their life or perspective.
- evaluate the effectiveness of their drafting by seeking feedback from peers and revising to improve clarity, organization, and impact.

Author: Kimberly Stelly
Editor: Mary Landry, C. Anneke Snyder
Supervisor: Terri Pantuso

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
C. Anneke Snyder
Kimberly Stelly
Mary Landry
Terri Pantuso
Date Added:
05/28/2024
"ENGL 1301-English Composition I" by Glenn Shaheen, Ymitri Mathison et al.
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CC BY-NC
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This OER packet contains the course materials for ENGL 1301 - English Composition I . In academic settings, the reasons for writing fulfill four main purposes: to summarize, to analyze, to synthesize, and to evaluate. You will encounter these four purposes not only as you read for your classes but also as you read for work or pleasure. Because reading and writing work together, your writing skills will improve as you read. Eventually, your instructors will ask you to complete assignments specifically designed to meet one of the four purposes. As you will see, the purpose for writing will guide you through each part of the paper, helping you make decisions about content and style. For now, identifying these purposes by reading paragraphs will prepare you to write individual paragraphs and to build longer assignments.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
-stuckey Delinda Marzette
Delinda Marzette -stuckey
Glenn Shaheen
Mathison Ymitri
Prairie View A M University
Richard Schmitt
Schmitt Richard
Shaheen Glenn
Ymitri Mathison
Date Added:
03/01/2022
English 1301 (Comp. I) - Rhetoric and the Workplace
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CC BY-NC
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This resource is an assignment for English 1301 (Composition 1) focused on the role of rhetoric in workplace writing. For this assignment, students prepare a job application packet consisting of a resume and cover letter. To do this, students must find an actual job advertisement posted online (or a job description) to include with their assignment. Students use their knowledge of the rhetorical situation and models of appropriate workplace writing (available from most college and university Career Centers, as well as from the Purdue OWL and UNC Writing Center websites online) to prepare an application packet tailored to the position they want. This assignment provides students with an opportunity to apply what they've learned in class toward a concrete, meaningful goal, and most students respond positively to it.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Jessica Zbeida
Date Added:
12/11/2021
English Composition I (ENGL 101)
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CC BY
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English 101 focuses on the analysis of basic human issues as presented in literature with an emphasis on analytic reading, writing and discussion, and on development of argumentative essays based on textual analysis, with attention to style, audience and documentation. By writing several analytical, thesis-driven essays which show engagement with and understanding of a variety of texts, students will practice the critical thinking, reading and writing skills which comprise an important component of college and university studies as well as clear, audience-appropriate communications in other professional settings.This class is comprised of a series of three units, each of which is centered around an essay assignment. For each unit, in addition to the essay itself, you‰ŰŞll be asked to respond to reading assignments and to complete exploratory writing assignments. You‰ŰŞll do a lot of reading and writing, and your instructor will ask you to respond to ideas from our texts, from specific assignments, and from each other. Login: guest_oclPassword: ocl

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
10/31/2011
Evaluating Sources [Activity]
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CC BY
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Upon successful completion of this activity, students will
- evaluate the reliability of a source by assessing the credibility and objectivity of its author, research methods and sources, publishing source and date, and more.

Author: Kimberly Stelly
Editor: Mary Landry, C. Anneke Snyder
Supervisor: Terri Pantuso

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
C. Anneke Snyder
Kimberly Stelly
Mary Landry
Terri Pantuso
Date Added:
05/29/2024
The Evaluative Essay: From Reading to Rating [Assignment/Rubric]
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CC BY
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Upon successful completion of this assignment, students will
- evaluate a given text against a predetermined rating system (unsatisfactory, needs improvement, meets expectations, exceeds expectations, and outstanding).
- compose an evaluation paper that integrates textual evidence, quotes, and paraphrases from the essay to support their ratings and overall assessment.

Author: Christopher Manes
Editor: Mary Landry, C. Anneke Snyder
Supervisor: Terri Pantuso

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
C. Anneke Snyder
Christopher Manes
Mary Landry
Terri Pantuso
Date Added:
05/28/2024
Evidence-Based Research & Argumentation Unit
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CC BY
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This unit is designed to support instructors as they guide students through the complex analytical, rhetorical, and research skills required to write advanced argumentative essays in a class setting similar to English 1302. Students will need these skills to succeed in most college courses, no matter what their major field of study may be. Content-wise, this unit first focuses on foundational research skills. Students will develop an open-ended, researchable question that guides them through a research proposal and an annotated bibliography, all while attending to source credibility. Building on this research, the unit then moves through the three core forms of argument: the Classical Argument, the Toulmin Argument, and the Rogerian Argument. Lesson presentations, assignments, and other instructional resources are included for each argument type.

Author: Kimberly Stelly
Editor: Mary Landry, C. Anneke Snyder
Supervisor: Terri Pantuso

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
C. Anneke Snyder
Kimberly Stelly
Mary Landry
Terri Pantuso
Date Added:
05/29/2024
Generating Ideas for Writing -  English 1301
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This resource explains the writing process steps and many prewriting strategies to help students come up with ideas for their college writing assignments. The resource was remixed from several other creative commons resources. It can be used as a textbook chapter for students to read and view the videos or as a prewriting assignment. It can also serve as an instructor resource to provide lecture notes and videos or in-class prewriting exercises.This resource was created to align to the English 1301 Student Learning Objective (SLO) "Develop ideas with appropriate support and attribution" as the initial idea-generation step of that process, and it also aligns to the English 1301 SLO "Demonstrate knowledge of individual writing processes," as it begins with explaining the writing process steps.  

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Module
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Textbook
Author:
Joy Pasini
Date Added:
06/20/2022
INRW 0112
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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0.0 stars

This is the 1-credit coreq designed to accompany ENGL 1301. The course has four components: grammar, reading questions, writing style assignments, and reflections. There is a module for each of the components, with templates, videos, and resources. There is also an instructional resources module. 

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Ashley Brinkman
Date Added:
08/04/2022
J. Zbeida, OER Advanced Skills Project - ENGL 1301+ (Coreq. ENGL/INRW) Course
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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0.0 stars

This resource is a template for redesigning a course to include OER. This template was designed for the OER Advanced Skills series in June 2023."Life is Sharing" image published on Wikimedia Commons by Alan Levine (CC BY-SA)

Subject:
Open Educational Resources & Practice
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Jessica Zbeida
Date Added:
06/25/2023
Let's Get Writing!
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CC BY
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0.0 stars

The layout of our book implies there is a beginning, middle, and end to a writing course, but because writing is both an art and a skill, people will find their own processes for learning, improving, and using these skills. Writing processes differ because we are each looking for a workable schemata that fits our way of thinking. Try out a variety of writing processes and strategies, and find what works for you. If you are not uncomfortable on this journey, you simply are not stretching yet.

A quick glance through the book will show you that it deftly covers the basics, which are always important to review as you get ready to build onto your scaffolding. Reminders of terminology that form the foundation of a discipline—as well as explanations, descriptions, and examples of their use in a basic education—are in chapters such as “Critical Reading,” “Writing Basics: What Makes a Good Sentence,” “The Writing Process,” “Punctuation,” and “Working with Words.” These are, of course, fundamentals that you have worked with throughout your education, learning in each course skills and habits that elevate your reading, writing, and thinking abilities. This college writing course will ensure that you take another step up to college and professional writing.

This text is different in its emphasis on research skills and research writing. The form you will learn, the building blocks of that form, the formality, and the sacrosanct crediting of sources is explained here from English professors and our instructional librarian at the college. Leaning on questions that lead to searches for answers that lead to arguments that present your understanding, the chapters “Critical Reading,” “Rhetorical Modes,” and “Argument” will fill out your growing appreciation of and comfort with the research form in everyday life. From the discussion of source types to guidance through the research process to the models of essay deconstruction, you will find that the expectations and language of this text begin with the college-level student in mind.

Working through this text will elevate you into the next stage of writing for a 21st century student and professional.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Elizabeth Browning
Jenifer Kurtz
Katelyn Burton
Kathy Boylan
Kirsten Devries
Date Added:
10/19/2021