Updating search results...

Search Resources

72 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • World Cultures
American Dream: Using Storytelling to Explore Social Class in the United States, Spring 2018
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course explores the experiences and understandings of class among Americans positioned at different points along the U.S. social spectrum. It considers a variety of classic frameworks for analyzing social class and uses memoirs, novels, and ethnographies to gain a sense of how class is experienced in daily life and how it intersects with other forms of social difference such as race and gender.

Subject:
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Christine Walley
Date Added:
01/01/2018
American Sign Language III (ASL 123)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

ASL III is the third quarter of the first year study of American Sign Language (ASL) and the people who use it. ASL III will enhance the use of ASL grammar and consist of concentrated efforts to develop the studentęs expressive and receptive skills. The course will continue to provide insights into Deaf Cultural values, attitudes and the Deaf community. Now learning more abstract concepts of the language, ASL III students will be able to: narrate events that occurred in the past, ask for solutions to everyday problems, tell about life events, and describe objects. Students will also be able to: demonstrate intermediate finger spelling competency, generate complex ASL structures with intermediate vocabulary knowledge, execute a wide variety of grammatical principles, including classifiers and inflections, adapt to different sign language registers, dialects and accents, and create opportunities to interact with members of the Deaf community.

Subject:
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
06/03/2021
Anthropological Theory, Spring 2003
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Seminar focuses on core issues and approaches in anthropological theory and method. Studies theoretical frameworks for the analysis and integration of material from other subjects in cultural anthropology. Subject provides instruction and practice in writing and revision whereby students produce one paper that is appropriate for publication or as a proposal for funding. This course introduces students to some of the major social theories and debates that inspire and inform anthropological analysis. Over the course of the semester, we will investigate a range of theoretical propositions concerning such topics as agency, structure, subjectivity, history, social change, power, culture, and the politics of representation. Ultimately, all theories can be read as statements about human beings and the worlds they create and inhabit. We will approach each theoretical perspective or proposition on three levels: (1) in terms of its analytical or explanatory power for understanding human behavior and the social world; (2) in the context of the social and historical circumstances in which they were produced; and (3) as contributions to ongoing dialogues and debate.

Subject:
World Cultures
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Silbey, Susan S.
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Anthropology Through Speculative Fiction, Fall 2009
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This class examines how anthropology and speculative fiction (SF) each explore ideas about culture and society, technology, morality, and life in "other" worlds. We investigate this convergence of interest through analysis of SF in print, film, and other media. Concepts include traditional and contemporary anthropological topics, including first contact; gift exchange; gender, marriage, and kinship; law, morality, and cultural relativism; religion; race and embodiment; politics, violence, and war; medicine, healing, and consciousness; technology and environment. Thematic questions addressed in the class include: what is an alien? What is "the human"? Could SF be possible without anthropology?

Subject:
Creative and Applied Arts
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Helmreich, Stefan
James, Erica
Date Added:
01/01/2010
The Anthropology of Sound, Spring 2008
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This class examines the ways humans experience the realm of sound and how perceptions and technologies of sound emerge from cultural, economic, and historical worlds. In addition to learning about how environmental, linguistic, and musical sounds are construed cross-culturally, students learn about the rise of telephony, architectural acoustics, and sound recording, as well as about the globalized travel of these technologies. Questions of ownership, property, authorship, and copyright in the age of digital file sharing are also addressed. A major concern will be with how the sound/noise boundary has been imagined, created, and modeled across diverse sociocultural and scientific contexts. Auditory examples--sound art, environmental recordings, music--will be provided and invited throughout the term.

Subject:
Creative and Applied Arts
World Cultures
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Helmreich, Stefan
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Architecture Studio: Building in Landscapes, Fall 2005
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This subject introduces skills needed to build within a landscape establishing continuities between the built and natural world. Students learn to build appropriately through analysis of landscape and climate for a chosen site, and to conceptualize design decisions through drawings and models.

Subject:
Creative and Applied Arts
Architecture and Design
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wampler, Jan
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Art Since 1940, Fall 2010
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This subject focuses on the objects, history, context, and critical discussion surrounding art since World War II. Because of the burgeoning increase in art production, the course is necessarily selective. We will trace major developments and movements in art up to the present, primarily from the US; but we will also be looking at art from Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as art "on the margins" -- art that has been overlooked by the mainstream critical press, but may have a broad cultural base in its own community. We will ask what function art serves in its various cultures of origin, and why art has been such a lightning rod for political issues around the world.

Subject:
Creative and Applied Arts
Architecture and Design
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jones, Caroline
Date Added:
01/01/2010
City to City: Comparing, Researching and Writing about Cities: New Orleans, Spring 2011
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

City to City, as a class, will jump into the complexity of planning in New Orleans, a post-disaster city. City-to-City will ask how a post-disaster city grapple with its ideas of identity, what it is, who it represents, and how it projects its sense of self to residences, businesses, tourists, and to the outside world. In considering its people, how do city planners think about who lives where and why? At the same time, how can city planners celebrate a city's history and its culture and how can these elements be woven into reconstruction? Students will travel from Cambridge to New Orleans over Spring Break to meet and consult with their alumni clients, and continue to work on projects.

Subject:
Creative and Applied Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Abbanat, Cherie Miot
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Creative Commons License Use Survey Instrument
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Overview: This survey instrument is designed to understand how creators use (or decide not to use) Creative Commons licenses. The target survey participants are people who create materials for documentation, maintenance, instruction, learning, and/or revitalization of Indigenous, minority, endangered, and/or low-resourced languages. Part 1 of this survey is designed to learn about the digital creation formats and sharing practices in this specific community of practice. Parts 2 through 4 of this survey contain general questions intended to elicit information about research participants’ knowledge and awareness of Creative Commons (CC) licenses; understanding of how to apply CC licenses to their digital creations; interest in and experience with applying CC licenses to their digital creations; motivations for and barriers to applying CC licenses to their digital creations; and understanding of how to adapt or reuse digital creations licensed with CC licenses.

This survey can be easily adapted for use in other communities of practice by editing some of the questions and multiple-choice responses.

If you wish to read this survey and background information about it, please start with the file ReadMe-CCLuseSurvey.pdf.

The file Creative_Commons_License_Use_Survey.qsf is a Qualtrics Survey File that can be used to recreate this survey in your own instance of the Qualtrics software.

The file Creative_Commons_License_Use_Survey.pdf is a PDF of the survey. This version includes Creative Commons graphics that are used in the survey questions. The file ReadMe-CCLuseSurvey.pdf does not include the graphics.

Subject:
Information Science
Languages
World Cultures
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Primary Source
Author:
Kung Susan Smythe
Date Added:
12/04/2021
Cross-Cultural Investigations: Technology and Development, Fall 2012
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course enhances cross-cultural understanding through the discussion of practical, ethical, and epistemological issues in conducting social science and applied research in foreign countries or unfamiliar communities. It includes a research practicum to help students develop interviewing, participant-observation, and other qualitative research skills, as well as critical discussion of case studies. The course is open to all interested students, but intended particularly for those planning to undertake exploratory research or applied work abroad. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.

Subject:
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Heather Paxson
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Cultural History of Technology, Spring 2005
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The subject of this course is the historical process by which the meaning of "technology" has been constructed. Although the word itself is traceable to the ancient Greek root teckhne (meaning art), it did not enter the English language until the 17th century, and did not acquire its current meaning until after World War I. The aim of the course, then, is to explore various sectors of industrializing 19th and 20th century Western society and culture with a view to explaining and assessing the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary (especially Anglo-American) thought and expression.

Subject:
Manufacturing
Engineering
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Marx, Leo
Williams, Rosalind
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Culturas hispanas a través de la pantalla / Hispanic Cultures Through the Screen
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Este libro de texto busca fomentar el visionado crítico de productos audiovisuales contemporáneos y el reflexionar sobre la representación de las culturas hispanas en webseries y vídeos musicales. This textbook aims to promote critical viewing of contemporary audiovisual products and thinking about the representation of Hispanic cultures in web series and music videos.

Subject:
World Cultures
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Minnesota Libraries Publishing Project
Author:
Ana M. López-Aguilera
Date Added:
02/14/2022
Digital Meijis
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The 2017-2018 academic year saw the 150th anniversary of Japan’s 1868 Meiji Restoration, an epochal political revolution that sparked Japan’s remarkable modernization, dramatic cultural transformation, and rapid emergence onto the global stage. To mark this historic date, colleagues across the University of British Columbia in the Centre for Japanese Research, the Department of History, the Department of Asian Studies, the Asian Library, and the Museum of Anthropology partnered to present the UBC Meiji at 150 Project. Over the course of the year, the Meiji at 150 project convened over 60 scholars of Japanese studies from around North America, Japan, and Europe to situate Japan in global history and to interrogate the place of the Meiji Restoration in Japanese history, historical pedagogy, and cultural studies. All told, the Meiji at 150 Project reached thousands of individuals around the globe through its various events and initiatives, centering the study of Japanese history in the UBC university community and solidifying UBC’s position as the premier institution for Japanese studies outside of Japan.

Subject:
History
World Cultures
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Open Textbooks
Author:
Meiji at 150 Project
Date Added:
08/13/2020
Disease and Health: Culture, Society, and Ethics, Spring 2012
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course examines how medicine is practiced cross-culturally, with particular emphasis on Western biomedicine. Students analyze medical practice as a cultural system, focusing on the human, as opposed to the biological, side of things. Also considered is how people in different cultures think of disease, health, body, and mind.

Subject:
World Cultures
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jean Jackson
Date Added:
01/01/2012
East Asia in the World, Spring 2003
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This subject examines the interactions of East Asia with the rest of the world and the relationships of each of the East Asian countries with each other, from ca. 1500 to 2000 A.D. Primary focus on China and Japan, with some reference to Korea, Vietnam, and Central Asia. Asks how international diplomatic, commercial, military, religious, and cultural relationships joined with internal processes to direct the development of East Asian societies. Subject addresses perceptions and misperceptions among East Asians and foreigners.

Subject:
Creative and Applied Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Perdue, Peter C.
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Einstein, Oppenheimer, Feynman: Physics in the 20th Century, Spring 2011
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course covers the role of physics and physicists during the 20th century, focusing on Einstein, Oppenheimer, and Feynman. Beyond just covering the scientific developments, institutional, cultural, and political contexts will also be examined.

Subject:
Creative and Applied Arts
World History
World Cultures
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kaiser, David
Date Added:
01/01/2011
The Emergence of Europe: 500-1300, Fall 2003
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Survey of the social, cultural, and political development of western Europe between 500 and 1300. Topics include: the Germanic conquest of the ancient Mediterranean world; the Carolingian Renaissance; feudalism and the breakdown of political order; the crusades; the quality of religious life; the experience of women; and the emergence of a revitalized economy and culture in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

Subject:
Creative and Applied Arts
Ancient History
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
McCants, Anne Elizabeth Conger
Date Added:
01/01/2003
End of Nature, Spring 2002
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

A brief history of conflicting ideas about mankind's relation to the natural environment as exemplified in works of poetry, fiction, and discursive argument from ancient times to the present. What is the overall character of the natural world? Is mankind's relation to it one of stewardship and care, or of hostility and exploitation? Readings include Aristotle, The Book of Genesis, Shakespeare, Descartes, Robinson Crusoe, Swift, Rousseau, Wordsworth, Darwin, Thoreau, Faulkner, and Lovelock's Gaia. This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the growth of ideas about nature and the natural environment of mankind. The term nature in this context has to do with the varying ways in which the physical world has been conceived as the habitation of mankind, a source of imperatives for the collective organization and conduct of human life. In this sense, nature is less the object of complex scientific investigation than the object of individual experience and direct observation. Using the term "nature" in this sense, we can say that modern reference to "the environment" owes much to three ideas about the relation of mankind to nature. In the first of these, which harks back to ancient medical theories and notions about weather, geographical nature was seen as a neutral agency affecting or transforming agent of mankind's character and institutions. In the second, which derives from religious and classical sources in the Western tradition, the earth was designed as a fit environment for mankind or, at the least, as adequately suited for its abode, and civic or political life was taken to be consonant with the natural world. In the third, which also makes its appearance in the ancient world but becomes important only much later, nature and mankind are regarded as antagonists, and one must conquer the other or be subjugated by it.

Subject:
Creative and Applied Arts
Literature
Philosophy
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kibel, Alvin C.
Date Added:
01/01/2002
Energy and Environment in American History: 1705-2005, Fall 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

A survey of how America has become the world's largest consumer of energy. Explores American history from the perspective of energy and its relationship to politics, diplomacy, the economy, science and technology, labor, culture, and the environment. Topics include muscle and water power in early America, coal and the Industrial Revolution, electrification, energy consumption in the home, oil and US foreign policy, automobiles and suburbanization, nuclear power, OPEC and the 70's energy crisis, global warming, and possible paths for the future.

Subject:
Creative and Applied Arts
World Cultures
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Shulman, Peter
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Environmental Struggles, Fall 2004
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This class explores the interrelationship between humans and natural environments. It does so by focusing on conflict over access to and use of the environment as well as ideas about "nature" in various parts of the world.

Subject:
World Cultures
Anthropology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Walley, Christine
Date Added:
01/01/2004