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BSAD Foundations in the Visual Arts, Fall 2003
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Offers a foundation in the visual art practice and its critical analysis for beginning architecture students. Emphasis on long-range artistic development and its analogies to architectural thinking and practice. Learn to communicate ideas and experiences through various two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and time-based media, including sculpture, installation, performance, and video. Lectures, visiting artist presentations, field trips, and readings supplement studio practice. Required of and restricted to Course 4 majors. Lab fee.

Subject:
Creative and Applied Arts
Architecture and Design
Performing Arts
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jacob, Wendy
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Dance Theory and Composition, Fall 2003
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Explores aesthetic and technical underpinnings of contemporary dance composition. Basic compositional techniques discussed and practiced with an emphasis on principles such as weight, space, time, effort, and shape. Principles of musicality considered and developed by each student. Working together, students create short compositions to help them understand the range of possibilities available when working with the medium of the human body. Selected viewing and reading exercises augment classroom work. Class attends at least two professional dance events in the Boston area.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
DeFrantz, Thomas
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Design for the Theater: Scenery, Spring 2005
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This course will examine theory of scenic design as currently practiced, as well as historical traditions for use of performance space and audience/performer engagement. Four play scripts and one opera or dance theater piece will be designed after in-depth analysis; emphasis will be on the social, political and cultural milieu at the time of their creation, and now.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fregosi, William A.
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Improvisation Recipe Book
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CC BY
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The following recipes, or games, are intended to be used as reference and study for the college course: Improvisation. This format has been set up to help with ease of quick learning and immediate application. Bon Appétit!

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
Identify Improvisational genres. Perform numerous and varying Improv games. Plan and Execute an Improv show. Evaluate performance. Examine and analyze aspects of the human experience and quickly construct an expression of that experience.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Linn-Benton Community College
Author:
Dan Stone
Date Added:
06/03/2021
Interdisciplinary Approaches to Musical Time, January IAP 2010
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This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of three broad topics concerning music in relation to time.Music as Architecture: the creation of musical shapes in time;Music as Memory: how musical understanding depends upon memory and reminiscence, with attention to analysis of musical structures; andTime as the Substance of Music: how different disciplines such as philosophy and neuroscience view the temporal dimension of musical processes and/or performances.Classroom discussion of these topics is complemented by three weekend concerts with pre-concert forums, jointly presented by the Boston Chamber Music Society (BCMS) and MIT Music & Theater Arts.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Marks, Martin
Shadle, Charles
Thompson, Marcus A
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Introduction to Stagecraft, Spring 2009
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" Offered in the spring and fall terms, Introduction to Stagecraft is a hands-on course that gets students working with the tools and techniques of theatrical production in a practical way. It is not a design course but one devoted to artisanship. Among the many remarkable final projects that have been proposed and presented at the end of the course have been a Renaissance hourglass blown in the MIT glass shop and set into a frame turned on our set shop lathe; a four harness loom built by a student who then wove cloth on it; a number of chain mail tunics and coifs; a wide variety of costume and furniture pieces and electrified period lighting fixtures."

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Brown, Sara
Held, Leslie Cocuzzo
Katz, Michael
Perlow, Karen
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance, Spring 2009
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" This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Milton and Ford. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. The primary theme of the class is to explore how England in the mid-seventeenth century became "a world turned upside down" by the new ideas and upheavals in religion, politics, and philosophy, ideas that would shape our modern world. Paying special attention to the "theatricality" of the new models and perspectives afforded by scientific experimentation, the class will read plays by Shakespeare, Tate, Brecht, Ford, Churchill, and Kushner, as well as primary and secondary texts from a wide range of disciplines. Students will also compose and perform in scenes based on that material."

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Henderson, Diana
Sonenberg, Janet
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Lighting Design for the Theatre, Fall 2003
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Examines the field of theatrical lighting design. Students gain an overall technical working knowledge of the tools of the trade and learn how and where to apply them to a final design. Explores artistic, conceptual, and collaborative processes of the craft. Hands-on approach with several classes spent in the theater. Students take advantage of the Boston theater scene by touring several off campus spaces and learning how theater architecture affects design choices. Assignments include: written script analysis, plot and paperwork for theoretical design in MIT theater space, and adaptation of plot to different spatial situations and locations. Oral presentations and in-class critiques. Final project required in which students execute a fully realized production (frequently a dance concert) from start to finish. This class explores the artistry of Lighting Design. Students gain an overall technical working knowledge of the tools of the trade, and learn how, and where to apply them to a final design. However essential technical expertise is, the class stresses the artistic, conceptual, collaborative side of the craft. The class format is a "hands on" approach, with a good portion of class time spent in a theatre.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Perlow, Karen J.
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Music Composition, Fall 2008
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Directed composition of larger forms of original writing involving voices and/or instruments. Includes a weekly seminar in composition for the presentation and discussion of student work in progress. Students are expected to produce at least one substantive work, performed in public, by the end of the term. Contemporary compositions and major works from twentieth-century music literature are studied. Meets with graduate subject 21M.505, but assignments vary.

Subject:
Creative and Applied Arts
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Child, Peter
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Music: Its Language, History, and Culture
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Welcome to Music 1300, Music: Its Language History, and Culture. The course has a number of interrelated objectives:
1. To introduce you to works representative of a variety of music traditions.These include the repertoires of Western Europe from the Middle Agesthrough the present; of the United States, including art music, jazz, folk, rock, musical theater; and from at least two non-Western world areas (Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, the Middle East, Indian subcontinent).
2. To enable you to speak and write about the features of the music you study,employing vocabulary and concepts of melody, rhythm, harmony, texture, timbre,and form used by musicians.
3. To explore with you the historic, social, and cultural contexts and the role of class, ethnicity, and gender in the creation and performance of music,including practices of improvisation and the implications of oral andnotated transmission.
4. To acquaint you with the sources of musical sounds—instruments and voices fromdifferent cultures, found sounds, electronically generated sounds; basic principlesthat determine pitch and timbre.
5. To examine the influence of technology, mass media, globalization, and transnationalcurrents on the music of today.
The chapters in this reader contain definitions and explanations of musical terms and concepts,short essays on subjects related to music as a creative performing art, biographical sketchesof major figures in music, and historical and cultural background information on music fromdifferent periods and places.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Brooklyn College
Author:
Douglas Cohen
Date Added:
08/13/2020
Music Since 1960, Spring 2006
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Begins with the premise that the 1960s mark a great dividing point in the history of twentieth-century Western musical culture, and explores the ways in which various social and artistic concerns of composers, performers, and listeners have evolved since that decade. Focuses on works by classical composers from around the world. Topics to be explored include: the impact of rock, as it developed during the 1960s-70s; the concurrent emergence of post-serial, neo-tonal, Minimalist, and New Age styles; the globalization of Western musical traditions; the impact of new technologies; and the significance of music video, video games, and other versions of (digital) multimedia. Interweaves discussion of these topics with close study of seminal musical works, evenly distributed across the four decades since 1960. Works by MIT composers included.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Robison, Brian
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Music Theory for the 21st-Century Classroom
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Music Theory for the 21st–Century Classroom is an openly–licensed online college music theory textbook that is meant to take the student from the basics of reading and writing pitches and rhythms through twelve–tone technique and minimalism over the course of four semesters. This text differs from other music theory textbooks by focusing less on four–part (SATB) voiceleading and more on relating harmony to the phrase. Also, in traditional music theory textbooks, there is little emphasis on motivic analysis and analysis of melodic units smaller than the phrase. Whenever possible, examples from popular music and music from film and musical theater are included to illustrate melodic and harmonic concepts, usually within the context of the phrase. Practice exercises (with answers), homework exercises, and practice tests are included.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
University of Puget Sound
Author:
Robert Hutchinson
Date Added:
09/30/2021
Music Theory for the 21st-Century Classroom
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Educational Use
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Music Theory for the 21st–Century Classroom is an openly–licensed online four–semester college music theory textbook. This text differs from other music theory textbooks by focusing less on four–part (SATB) voiceleading and more on relating harmony to the phrase. Also, in traditional music theory textbooks, there is little emphasis on motivic analysis and analysis of melodic units smaller than the phrase. In my opinion, this led to students having difficulty with creating melodies, since the training they are given is typically to write a “melody” in quarter notes in the soprano voice of part writing exercises. When the assignments in those texts ask students to do more than this, the majority of the students struggle to create a melody with continuity and with appropriate placement of harmonies within a phrase because the text had not prepared them to do so.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Puget Sound
Author:
Robert Hutchinson
Date Added:
02/14/2022
Music and Psychology
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This YouTube channel hosts a series of short (about 15 min) talks and performances for the Pavlov/Tertis Project, which explores connections between music and psychology. The talks were written and delivered by Michael Domjan, Professor of Psychology at the University of Texas, who is an internationally recognized expert in conditioning and learning. Dr. Domjan also received training as a violist in the preparatory division of the Juilliard School of Music. In this series of videos, he combines his knowledge of psychology with his knowledge of music. Topics include How is psychology relevant to music, Neuroscience and music, Habituation and sensitization in the music of J. S. Bach, Types of memory in musical performance, Why is it harder to teach playing the violin. than playing baseball, What is a Tertis viola?, How is Pavlovian conditioning relevant to music?, Talent vs practice in musical expertise, Why is it important to practice a musical instrument, and What I learned in a music conservatory that made me a better scientist.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Psychology
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
Michael Domjan
Date Added:
02/23/2022
Music and Technology: Live Electronics Performance Practices, Spring 2011
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This course is a creative, hands-on exploration of contemporary and historical approaches to live electronics performance and improvisation, including basic analog instrument design, computer synthesis programming, and hardware and software interface design.

Subject:
Electronic Technology
Creative and Applied Arts
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ariza, Christopher
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Music on the Move
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Music is a mobile art. When people move to faraway places, whether by choice or by force, they bring their music along. Music creates a meaningful point of contact for individuals and for groups; it can encourage curiosity and foster understanding; and it can preserve a sense of identity and comfort in an unfamiliar or hostile environment. As music crosses cultural, linguistic, and political boundaries, it continually changes. While human mobility and mediation have always shaped music-making, our current era of digital connectedness introduces new creative opportunities and inspiration even as it extends concerns about issues such as copyright infringement and cultural appropriation.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Michigan
Author:
Danielle Fosler-Lussier
Date Added:
02/14/2022
Playwrights' Workshop, Spring 2012
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This course provides continued work in the development of play scripts for the theater. Writers work on sustained pieces in weekly workshop meetings, individual consultation with the instructor, and in collaboration with student actors, directors, and designers. Fully developed scripts are eligible for inclusion in the Playwrights' Workshop Production.

Subject:
Creative and Applied Arts
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Alan Brody
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Playwriting I, Spring 2005
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This course includes an introduction to the craft of writing for the theater. Through weekly exercises and work on a sustained piece, students explore the problems of scene structure, action, and their relation to the dialogue. Class meetings include examination of produced playscripts and discussion of student work.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Harrington, Laura
Date Added:
01/01/2005