Author:
Joanna Schimizzi
Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Module
Level:
Graduate/Professional
Tags:
License:
Creative Commons Attribution
Language:
English

What is Open Education?

What is Open Education?

Overview

By the end of this lesson, participants will be able to:

  • Define Open Educational Resources
  • Describe the 5 R's of OER permissions
  • Identify what is and isn't OER
  • Articulate the benefits of open education

What is OER?

What is Open Education?

Education involves the creation, distribution and iteration of knowledge. Faculty often have many different roles, usually with a focus on collaboration and connection. Open Education is a philosophy about removing barriers to accessing and engaging with knowledge and practices, with an invitation to include students in the co-creation of resources.

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation defines Open Education as “the myriad of learning resources, teaching practices, and education policies that use the flexibility of [Open Educational Resources] to provide learners with high quality educational experiences.”

 

This video from Blink Tower shares more anbout "Why Open Education Matters"

 

Why Open Education Matters

 

What is OER?

Open Educational Resource (OER) means a teaching, learning, or research resource that is in the public domain or has been released under an intellectual property license that permits the free use, adaptation, and redistribution of the resource by any person. Texas Education Code (TEC), Section 51.451

 

OER include a wide range of materials: assessments, assignments, books, case studies, courses, journals, primary sources, reference materials, simulations, tutorials, tests, and textbooks.

 

Before going farther, take time to Download or View the OER in Texas Statewide Playbook and read Module 1.1 (pgs. 2-3).

 

OER often have a Creative Commons license or other permission to let you know how the material may be used, reused, adapted, and shared. When you create a teaching and learning resource, you may also choose to openly license your resource as well.

What is OER?

 

What can you do with OER?

  1. Reuse - Content can be reused in its unaltered original format - the right to use the content in a wide range of ways (e.g., in a class, in a study group, on a website, in a video)

  2. Retain - Copies of content can be retained for personal archives or reference - the right to make, own, and control copies of the content (e.g., download, duplicate, store, and manage)

  3. Revise - Content can be modified or altered to suit specific needs - the right to adapt, adjust, modify, or alter the content itself (e.g., translate the content into another language)

  4. Remix - Content can be adapted with other similar content to create something new- the right to combine the original or revised content with other material to create something new (e.g., incorporate the content into a mashup)

  5. Redistribute - Content can be shared with anyone else in its original or altered format - the right to share copies of the original content, your revisions, or your remixes with others (e.g., give a copy of the content to a friend)

OER include a wide range of materials: assessments, assignments, books, case studies, courses, journals, primary sources, reference materials, simulations, tutorials, tests, and textbooks.

 

If you'd like to practice more with your understanding of what type of materials are OER, you can explore this "Defining the Open in OER" H5P Flip Card activity from Student Success Library and Learning Services at Conestoga.

 

Reflect, Connect and Practice

To reflect on your learning, connect with other colleagues and practice your understanding of OER, please visit this Discussion Board and reply to the 1.1 Discussion Board Prompt.

 

https://libraries.etsu.edu/research/oer/home: Some material from above is based on original writing by David Wiley, which was published freely under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license at http://opencontent.org/definition