Author:
Susan Kwosek
Subject:
World History, World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment, Homework/Assignment, Syllabus
Level:
Academic Lower Division
Tags:
  • Ancient History
  • World Civilizations
  • World History
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Text/HTML

    History of World Civilizations to 1750 Syllabus

    Overview

    This course surveys the rise, growth, and flowering of world civilizations in Africa, America, Asia, and Europe. It emphasizes diversity as well as universal themes which unite all human cultures. It is appropriate for grades 11-12, community college stidents, and university underclassmen.

    Syllabus

    The online text lectures are derived from my lecture notes from past courses. Supplemental audio, video, readings, and games are open educational resources. This course does not use a textbook.

    South Carolina State University

    Spring 2021

    H250-45 History of World Civilizations:

    Beginnings to 1750 Online

     

    Jan 4 – Apr 27

    ONLINE

    Instructor: Susan Kwosek

    Department of Social Sciences -HISTORY

     

    Email: skwosek@scsu.edu

     

     

    Office Hours

    Office: NH 307-0

     

    Monday & Wednesday           10:00-11:30

    Tuesday & Thursday              2:00-3:00

     

    Virtual office meetings are available upon request.

    To connect to Dr. Kwosek’s virtual office, plug in a headset to your computer; open a web browser, then copy and paste the following URL into the web browser:

    https://us.bbcollab.com/guest/a4859dfe68304c088dffca4996ef4229

     

     

     

     

    I am a DREAMer & LGBTQ Ally

     

    Note: Syllabus may change without notice in response to unanticipated events

     

    Course Description

    This course surveys the rise, growth, and flowering of world civilizations in Africa, America, Asia, and Europe. It emphasizes diversity as well as universal themes which unite all human cultures.

     

    Disciplinary Approach

    Historical inquiry is not a list names and dates, and it is not “just what happened.”  The historical discipline requires not only reading source materials, but also analysis of those materials and the claims they make or the matters they choose to leave unrecorded.  Historical analysis is based on evidence from the past filtered through scholarly scrutiny. NOT ALL SOURCES OF INFORMATION ARE CREATED EQUAL. In this course, you will not only learn about world civilizations, but you will begin the process of learning to study, speak, and write as scholarly historians.  This means that your participation in this course, whether spoken, written, gestured, or signed must remain rooted in historical evidence as presented during the course rather than personal beliefs. We will engage with scholarly sources of information and conduct intellectual group discussions.  For additional communication expectations please refer to “Respectful Participation” under the section heading “Course Requirements.”

     

    Prerequisite

    Mastery of the following tasks using Blackboard Learn 9.1:

    • Navigate the Blackboard Learn 9.1 interface

    • Share documents with classmates using the Blackboard Group Tool

    • Submit a document using the Assignment Tool

    • Send an email message to the course instructor using the Email Tool

    • Post comments to a discussion forum

    • Reply to comments posted to a discussion forum

     

        

     

    Required Textbook

     

    None required. All learning materials are online in Blackboard. 

    Alternately, the lessons correspond to the chapters in this textbook:

    Worlds Together, Worlds Apart, vol. 1, concise 2E, Elizabath Pollard et. al.

    ISBN: 0393668541

    Course Objectives / Learning Outcomes

    1. Students should be able to demonstrate a broad, comparative understanding of the human past (context) by:

    • Articulating the ways in which members of past societies constructed and experienced history differentiated by time, place, and person. (diversity)
    • Identifying both change and continuity in long-term historical developments (change/continuity)
    • Explaining distinctions between historical periods, places, actors, events, and forces using academic language and current analytical approaches within the historical discipline (explanation)

    2. Students should be able to demonstrate their ability to think critically about the past (critical thinking) by:

    • Engaging in historical discussions that include causation, chronology, contingency, complexity, multiple perspectives, historical empathy, and contemporary relevance (consciousness)
    • Expressing curiosity about the past by asking historical questions in the language of the discipline (curiosity)
    • Locating and using primary sources to address historical questions (historical record)

    3. Students should be able to demonstrate ability to develop original and complex interpretations of the past (discovery) by:

    • Conveying oral and written explanations of the past using clear and grammatically correct language (communication/expression)

     

    Instructional Methods

    In addition to the textbook, combinations of online presentation content, web-based readings, discussions posts, interactive technologies and online quizzes will be used throughout the course.

    Technical Support

    If you need assistance with Blackboard Learn 9.1, please contact Blackboard Support Services at (844) 348-1608 or online at:

    https://help.edusupportcenter.com/shplite/scsu/home.

    Blackboard Support Services are available 24 hours a day/7 days a week/365 days a year.

     

    If you have forgotten your SC State username or password, your account is locked or your password needs to be reset, please contact the UCITS Help Desk at (803) 536-8111 or send an email to helpme@scsu.edu. Please include your username and a contact number.

     

    Technical Requirements

    The course will be taught using the Blackboard Learn learning management system. Your computer should have at least: 4GB of RAM and Windows 7 or Mac OS 10.5, or higher.

     

    NOTE:

    Please do not rely exclusively on using a tablet computer, including an iPad, or a smartphone to use Blackboard. Not all features will work on mobile devices. You will need access to a full computer to be able to do everything in your Blackboard class.

     

    Software: Microsoft Word

    Plug-ins: Adobe Acrobat Reader - https://get.adobe.com/reader/ (copy and paste the web link into your internet browser and click on Install Now, then follow the on-screen prompts)

    Attendance & Participation

    Although this course is taught online, this is not a correspondence, self-paced, or independent study course. Participants will have assignments and other activities with due dates and some of these assignments will require you to work collaboratively with other members of the class. “Attendance” in an online course is defined as active participation in the course as outlined in the course syllabus. You should login to the course at least once per day to complete learning activities and assignments. Weekly participation in and completion of specified learning activities is required to successfully complete this course.

    Assignment Submission

    All assignments must be submitted electronically via Blackboard Learn 9.1 unless otherwise instructed by the course facilitator.

    Late Assignments

    Assignments must be submitted by the designated due dates/times as outlined within weekly modules posted in the Blackboard course site. The acceptance of late assignments is at the discretion of the course facilitator. All requirements for the course must be completed during the course dates. No requests for extensions will be accepted after the closing date for the course.  

    Response Time to Emails

    The course facilitator will respond to emails from participants within 24 business hours, Monday – Friday.

    Return of Graded Assignments

    The Instructor will make every effort to return graded assignments within four business (4) days following the assignment due date.

    Nettiquette

    Participants are expected demonstrate respect and sensitivity in communications and interactions with fellow classmates and the course facilitator. The online course environment is not the place for abusive language, personal attacks, or other actions deemed inappropriate.

    Proctored Exams

    There are no proctored exams required for this course.

     

     

     

    Assessment Measures

    This course is worth 150 points total. Do not take assignments for granted because you see a low point value. Every point counts. Because you know the total is 150 points, you will always be able to look at your scores on Blackboard and easily calculate your current grade.

     

    Students will be made aware of their progress toward fulfilling course objectives via:

     

    1. Reviews & Study Guide Assignments will total 15% of your final grade (22 points)

     

    1. Miscellaneous Assignments will total 5% of your final grade

     

    1. Online discussions will total 8% of your final grade (4 topics x 3 points each)

     

    1. Journal entries will total 24% of your final grade (12 journals x 3 points  each = 36 points)

     

    1. Vocabulary quizzes will total 17% of your final grade. You many repeat each quiz as many times as you want to improve your score (13 quizzes x 2 points each = 26 points)

     

    1. The final exam will total 15% of your final grade.  (22 points)

     

    1. The final project will total 16% of your final grade. (24 points)

     

    Estimated Time Requirements

    Students should expect to spend 3-6 hours per week reading the textbook and completing online instructional materials and assignments.

    Plagiarism

    Plagiarism is not only quoting a source verbatim without crediting that source.  If an idea or concept is not wholly your own you MUST cite the source from which you gained the knowledge.  Any act of plagiarism, large or small, will result in course failure. Procedures regarding academic misconduct are available online at

    https://www.scsu.edu/studentaffairs/officeofstudentdisabilityservices.aspx

    Disability Services

    Students with a disability who require reasonable accommodations to fully participate in this course should notify the instructor within the first two weeks of the semester. Such students should work closely with the Office for Disability Services. The telephone number is 803-536-7245. Online information is available at https://www.scsu.edu/studentaffairs/officeof

    studentdisabilityservices.aspx

     

     

     

     

    Academic Warnings

    Student progress is monitored, and progress indicators are posted on Blackboard throughout the semester. Instructors and academic advisors usually communicate with students if problems arise, but it is the responsibility of the student to check, and to take immediate action when necessary to improve the grade. If there are issues related to attendance; missing assignments, and/or limited progress, please contact the instructor and your academic advisor as soon as possible

     

    Academic Honesty & Conduct

    Academic misconduct includes but is not limited to cheating, encouraging academic dishonesty, fabrication, plagiarism, bribes, favors, threats, grade tampering, non-original work, and examination by proxy.  Procedures regarding academic misconduct are available online at https://www.scsu.edu/admissions/registrarsoffice/academicregulations

    degreerequirements.aspx

     

    Discrimination & Harassment

    All members of the SCSU community are required to follow the policy available in the Student Handbook.  Cyber bullying on social media is a form of electronic harassment and will not be tolerated.

     

    Criteria for Final Grades

    Final grades encompass all participation, assignments, activities, exams, and papers for the semester.

     

    A

    90% or higher

    Student clearly demonstrates understanding of the ideas presented via lecture or in course readings and is able to express original and creative thought via class participation and assignments which are completed on time and reflect meticulous attention to accuracy, writing skill, and overall expression of ideas.

     

    B

    80% – 89%

    Student clearly demonstrates understanding of the ideas presented via lecture or in course readings and is able to express original and creative thought the majority of the time via class participation and assignments which are completed on time and reflect significant attention to accuracy, writing skill, and overall expression of ideas.

     

    C

    70 – 79%

    Student demonstrates some understanding of the ideas presented via lecture or in course readings and is able to engage in some discussion of these ideas via class participation and assignments which are completed mainly on time and reflect attempted attention to accuracy, writing skill, and overall expression of ideas.

     

    D

    60 – 69%

    Student cannot demonstrate understanding of the ideas presented via lecture or in course readings or is not able to engage in some discussion of these ideas via class participation and assignments; or assignments are not often completed on time or do not reflect attention to accuracy, writing skill, or overall expression of ideas.

     

    F

    59% or lower

    Student cannot demonstrate understanding of the ideas presented via lecture or in course readings or is not able to engage in some discussion of these ideas via class participation and assignments; or assignments are not often completed on time or do not reflect attention to accuracy, writing skill, or overall expression of ideas.

    Counseling Services

    Counseling services are provided at no charge to all undergraduate and graduate students who feel overwhelmed by academic, personal and professional concerns. Appointments can be made in person at the Counseling and Self Development Center or by phoning (803) 536-7245. Office Hours: Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. In the event of an after-hours or weekend emergency, please contact the University Police Department at (803) 536-7188.

    Student Success and Retention

    Students who are not performing well academically please contact the Student Success and Retention Programs office. They are there to help you. Online information is available at https://www.scsu.edu/currentstudents/studentsuccessandretention

    programs.aspx

    COVID-19 Guidelines for Face-to-Face Courses

    Each of us shares responsibility for the health and safety of all in the classroom environment. Maintain social distances, wear a face cover, and quarantine when ill are university directives that we all must follow until further notice (for the latest guidance see the “Health & Social Distancing Guidelines” at  http://reopen.scsucovid19.com/ ). Specifically, in this classroom we will mitigate the risks of virus transfer by abiding by the following safety directives:

    • maintain 6 feet of social distance at all times
    • wear a face covering (disposable or cloth) for the entirety of class, with both nose and mouth covered
    • stay home when sick

    Any student who does not follow these provisions will be asked once to follow the safety directives. If the student does not comply, I will next ask the student to leave the class for that day. I will also refer the matter to the Dean of Students Office for review and possible disciplinary actions as described in the SCSU Student Code of Conduct should a student persist in ignoring safety directives. https://www.scsu.edu/files/Student%20Code%20of%20Conduct%20-%20MP%2082119.pdf

     

     

    Course Calendar & Due Dates

    Assignments and open educational resources used in the course are listed in the next section, "Assignments & Resources."

    Calendar & Due Dates

     

    All readings are to be completed during the week indicated.  Weeks (except for the last week) begin on Monday and end Sunday night at 11:59 p.m. All course assignments, quizzes, exams, etc. are due by the last day of the week (Sunday) by 11:59 p.m. unless otherwise indicated. The course ends Tuesday, April 27. No coursework will be accepted after that date.

     

    Week

    Topic

    Reading

     

    Coursework Due This Week

    Point

    Week 1

    Jan 4-10

    Course Orientation

    General Education Course Pre-Test

    Note Taking Skills (NTS) Pre-Test

     

    Syllabus Quiz...............................

    Introduction Assignment….….

    Ungraded Pre-Test………..….

    Ungraded NTS Pre-Test……

    3

    1

    1

    1

    Week 2

    Jan 11-17

    Becoming Human

     

    Note Taking Skills (NTS) Post-Test

    Topic 1

     

    Topic 1 Quiz…………...……

    Topic 1 Journal…….…………

    Graded NTS Post-Test……….

    2

    3

    1

    Week 3

    Jan 18-24

    Rivers, Cities, and First States

    Topic 2

    Topic 2 Quiz……………….…

    Topic 2 Discussion…………...

    Topic 2 Journal………….……

    2

    3

    3

    Week 4

    Jan 25-31

    Nomads, Territorial States, and Microsocieties

    Topic 3

    Topic 3 Quiz……………..…

    Topic 3 Journal……………..

    Topics 1-3 Study Guide………

    2

    3

    3

    Week 5

    Feb 1-7

    Review Topics 1-3

    First Empires and Common Cultures

     

    Topic 4

    Topic 1-3 Review …………..

    Topic 4 Quiz………………..

    Topic 4 Journal……………..

    Project Update 1…................

    2

    2

    3

    1

    Week 6

    Feb 8-14

    Worlds Turned Inside Out

    Review Topics 1-5: Map Review

    Topic 5

    Topic 5 Quiz…………..……

    Topic 5 Journal………..……

    Topics 1-5 Map Review ……..

    2

    3

    2

    Week 7

    Feb 15-21

    Shrinking the Afro-Eurasian World, 350-100 BCE

    Topic 6

    Topic 6 Quiz…………..……

    Topic 6 Journal……………..

    Topic 6 Discussion……….....

    2

    3

    3

    Week 8

    Feb 22-28

    Review Topics 4-6:

    Han Dynasty China & Imperial Rome, 300 BCE – 300 CE

     

    Topic 7

    Topics 4-6 Review ………..

    Topics 4-6 Study Guide  …..

    Topic 7 Quiz……………..…

    Topic 7 Journal…………..…

    2

    3

    2

    3

    Week 9

    Mar 1-7

    The Rise of Universalizing Religions, 300-600 CE

    NO CLASSES Monday March 1

    Topic 8

     

     

    Topic 8 Quiz………..……

    Topic 8 Journal………..……

    Topic 8 Discussion………….

    2

    3

    3

    Week 10

    Mar 8-14

    New Empires and Common Cultures, 600-1000 CE

    NO CLASSES Tuesday March 9

    Topic 9

    Topic 9 Quiz………………….

    Topic 9 Journal…………….…

    2

    3

    Week 11

    Mar 15-21

     

     

     

    Becoming the World, 1000-1300 CE

    NO CLASSES Wednesday March 17

     

     

     

    Topic 10

    Topics 7-9 Review ………..…

    Topic7-9 Study Guide ………..

    Project Update 2 ……………..

    Topic 10 Quiz……….………..

    Topic 10 Journal……………..

    2

    3

    1

    2

    3

    Week 12

    Mar22-28

    Crisis & Recovery in Afro-Eurasia, 1300-1500 CE

    NO CLASSES Thursday March 25

    Topic 11

    Topic 11 Quiz………….……..

    Topic 11 Journal……….……..

    Topic 11 Discussion………….

    2

    3

    3

    Week 13

    Mar 29-Apr 4

    Contact, Commerce, and Colonization, 1450-1600

    NO CLASSES Friday April 2

    Topic 12

    Topic 12 Quiz……….………..

    Topic 12 Journal……….……..

    Topic 10-12 Review ……..…

    2

    3

    2

    Week 14

    Apr 5-11

    Worlds Entangled, 1600-1750

    Topic 13

    Topic 13 Quiz………………

    Topics 10-13 Study Guide….

    Ungraded GEC Post-Test…….

    2

    3

    1

    Week 15

    Apr12-18

    Vocabulary list for the Final Exam will be available in Blackboard Monday, April 12 by noon.

    FINAL EXAM DUE Sunday, April 18 by 11:59 p.m.

    No New Material

    Final Exam…………………...

    22

    Week 16

    Apr19-27

    Work on your final project.

    FINAL PROJECT DUE Tuesday, April 27 by 11:59 p.m.

    No New Material

    Final Project…………….……

    22

    TOTAL POINTS FOR THE COURSE

    150

     

     

    Assignments and Resources for the Orientation & Topic 1 Lessons

    A list of Instructor resources by lesson topic appears below. Assignments are attached and named to reflect their placement in the course.

    Week

    List of Instructor Resources & Assignments by Lesson Topic

    Week 1

    Jan 4-10

    Course Orientation

    After completing this lesson you willl be able to:

    • Define the six overall course themes
    • Use the course syllabus to locate important information

    Syllabus Quiz (attached)

    General Education Pre-Test (attached)

    Note Taking Skills Pre-Test (attached)

    Introduce Yourself (attached)

    Week 2

    Jan 11-17

    Topic 1: Becoming Human 

    Topic 1 Vocabulary List (attached)

    Powerpoint Show: Lucy & the Fruit Tree (Australopithecines) (attached)

    Note Taking Skills Post-Test (attached)

    Topic 1 Quiz (attached)

     

     

    Assignments and Resources for Topics 2 and 3

     

    Instructor Resources & Assignments

    Week 3

    Jan 18-24

    Topic 2: Rivers, Cities, and First States:

    Review of Topic 1 (attached)

    Topic 2 Vocabulary List (attached)

    Link to the Epic of Gilgamesh:

    https://archive.org/details/TheEpicofGilgamesh_201606/mode/2up

    Video: King Tut's tomb unveiled after decade-long restoration (CBS news)

    YouTube URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdeC2-vSDtQ

    Video: Steve Martin "King Tut" (SNL): https://youtu.be/FYbavuReVF4

    Topic 2 Vocabulary Quiz (attached)

    Topic 2 Discussion Assignment (attached)

    Topic 2 Journal Assignment (attached)

    Printable Maps (attached)

    Week 4

    Jan 25-31

    Topic 3: Nomads, Territorial States, and Microsocieties

    Topic 3 Vocabulary List (attached)

    Topic 3 Quiz and Answers

    Topic 3 Journal Assignment (attached)

    Printable Maps (attached)

    Assignments and Resources for Topics 4 and 5

     

    Instructor Resources & Assignments

    Week 5

    Feb 1-7

    Topic 4: First Empires and Common Cultures

    Review of Topics 1-3 (attached)

    Topic 4 Vocabulary List (attached)

    Topic 4 Vocabulary Quiz (attached)

    Topic 4 Journal Assignment (attached)

    Printable Maps (attached)

    Week 6

    Feb 8-14

    Topic 5: Worlds Turned Inside Out

    Topic 5 Vocabulary List (attached)

    Daoist meditation music: "Happiness of Immortal Gods" https://youtu.be/bHvznGZXtZ0

    Table: Comparison of Brahmanism & Jainism in India (attached)

    Topic 5 Vocabulary Quiz (attached)

    Link to Topics 1-5 Map Review Activity https://www.educaplay.com/learning-resources/5671143-world_civilizations_map.html

    Topic 5 Journal Assignment (attached)

    Printable Maps (attached)

    Assignments and Resources for Topics 6 and 7

     

     

    Instructor Resources & Assignments

    Week 7

    February 15-21

    Topic 6: Shrinking the Afro-Eurasian World, 350-100 BCE

    Topic 6 Objectives:

    After completing this lesson you will be able to:

    • Define Hellenism and discuss its impact across Afro-Eurasia
    • Describe the spread and adaptation of Buddhism
    • Describe the ways in which land and sea travel connected Afro-Eurasia
    • Locate the following place on a map:
      • Macedonia

     

    Review of Topics 1-3 (attached)

    Topic 4 Vocabulary List (attached

    Topic 4 Vocabulary Quiz (attached)

    Topic 4 Journal Assignment (attached)

    Printable Maps (attached)

    Week 8

    Februaru 22-28

    Topic 5: Worlds Turned Inside Out

    Topic 5 Vocabulary List (attached)

    Daoist meditation music: "Happiness of Immortal Gods" https://youtu.be/bHvznGZXtZ0

    Table: Comparison of Brahmanism & Jainism in India (attached)

    Topic 5 Vocabulary Quiz (attached)

    Link to Topics 1-5 Map Review Activity https://www.educaplay.com/learning-resources/5671143-world_civilizations_map.html

    Topic 5 Journal Assignment (attached)

    Printable Maps (attached)

    Assignments and Resources for Topics 8 and 9

    Week 9

    Mar 1-7

    Topic 8: The Rise of Universalizing Religions, 300-600 CE

    Objectives:

    • Describe the characteristics of universalizing religions
    • Explain the relationship between empires and universalizing religions
    • Explain why universalizing religions developed to varying degrees in Afro-Eurasia, but not develop elsewhere in the world
    • Locate the following places on a map:
      • Eastern Roman Empire (Capital: Rome, Italy)
      • Western Roman Empire (Capital: Constantinople)
      • India
      • Sub-Saharan Africa
      • Mayan Civilization

    Assignments & Resources:

    Topic 8 Vocabulary List (attached)

    Topic 8 Vocabulary Quiz with Answers (attached)

    Video: Roman Mythology Animated https://youtu.be/iPAwnvyN6xw

    Nicene Creed (attached)

    Sub-Saharan Africa on a World Map (attached)

    Bantu Migration on Map of Africa (attached)

    Video: The Great Bantu Migration https://youtu.be/B7dtsda1J9M

    The Great Bantu Migration Transcript (attached)

    Topic 8 Journal Assignment based on The Great Bantu Migration video (attached)

    Mayan Homeland on Map of the Americas (attached)

     

    Week 10

    Mar 8-14

    Topic 9: New Empires and Common Cultures, 600-1000 CE