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    Miles College-Open Educational Resource (OER) Course Syllabus: EN 101

    Miles College-Open Educational Resource (OER) Course Syllabus: EN 101

    Overview

    This is an OER syllabus for EN 101 English Composition I at Miles College. This syllabus was created as part of a HBCU Textbook Transformation Grant awarded to the institution, for the purpose of replacing high cost textbooks with appropriate OERs.

    Miles College - Open Educational Resource (OER) Course Syllabus: EN 101

     

     

    Miles College

     Open Educational Resource (OER) Course Syllabus: EN 101

    Miles College QEP: Enhancing Reading through Metacognition

     

    SEMESTER & YEAR: Spring 2021

    COURSE TITLE: EN 101 English Composition I

    COURSE HOURS: 3 Hours

    Course Description:

    COURSE D                                                Students in this course review the fundamentals of grammar and improve critical reading and writing skills. Through a variety of readings, both fiction and non-fiction, they explore various modes of academic writing. They also master the basic principles of essay construction and become familiar with at least three patterns of essay development. They also post to online forums. 

    Prerequisite: Placement in English 101 by testing center or pass EN 099/100 satisfactorily

    OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES (OER) TEXTBOOK(S) AND OTHER OER LEARNING RESOURCES:

    • All readings and other course materials will be available online and free of charge through the Blackboard course site.
    •  These specific learning resources are detailed in the Course Schedule below.
    • The only thing you will need is a computer and reliable internet access from which you can access the course.

    COURSE STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs)

    A. Students will demonstrate knowledge of understanding articles, essays, and short stories through in-class discussions, and discussion assignments.

    B.  Students will demonstrate a knowledge of how to write essays of at least five paragraphs that include thesis statements, well-developed body paragraphs, and conclusions.  

    C. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of how to take a midterm and final examination to show evidence of reading and understanding articles, essays, and short stories.

    Reading Assignments:

    Use the OER learning resources and access the internet to read the following stories:

    • Bambara, Toni Cade. “The Lesson.”
    • Ralph Ellison. “Battle Royal”
    • Hughes, Langston. “Thank You, Ma’am.”
    • Hurston, Zora Neale. “The Gilded Six-Bits.”
    • Walker, Alice. “Everyday Use.”
    • Wright, Richard. “The Man Who Was Almost a Man.”

    National and/or State Standards met by this course:

    English 101 meets the requirements set out by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools through instruction in 1c) standard American English, to include clarity of enunciation and expression, 2) the writing process, including the stages of prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing, and the role of writing across the curriculum, and 3) the impact of purpose, occasion, and audience on written and spoken discourse [Alabama State Dept. of Education Rule 290-3-3-10].

    Humanities Division Mission Statement:

    The general education core helps students gain competence in communication skills; scientific and mathematical concepts; and the use of technology.  It also helps them to understand how the following factors affect the current problems of our nation and world: socio-economic and political conditions; historical events, and cultural diversity.  In addition, students learn skills in interpersonal relationships, physical health, and mental health; they apply these skills to individuals and the community.  Stakeholders include not only students, but also their families, employers, and communities.

     

    EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT

    The following list is a breakdown of how each student will be evaluated for final grade calculations at the end of the term:

    Weekly Assignments/Participation:                                                33.3%

    Major/WAM Assignments:                                                              33.3%

    Midterm and Final Exam:                                                               33.3%

                                                                                                                 100%

    MILES COLLEGE’S GRADE BREAKDOWN:

    90-100%                      A

    80-89%                        B

    70-79%                        C

    60-69%                        D

    59% or below              F    

                                                                                         

    According to the common rubric, all essays and paragraphs are graded for content (50%) and for adherence to grammatical conventions (50%). This is the Humanities standard for a writing course. Papers may receive an extra grade for the process. Oral presentations are assessed according to a common rubric as well.

    EN101: CORE COMPETENCIES:

     

    Check when completed

     

    Date Completed

     

     

     

    Core Competencies Guide Sheet

     

     

    Throughout the semester

     

     

    March 2-6

    May 4-6

    A. Students will demonstrate knowledge of understanding articles, essays, and short stories through in-class discussions, and discussion assignments.

    1. Midterm Assessment

    2. Final Assessment

    Show improvement on standardized reading comprehension tests. Respond to discussion topics on Blackboard.

     

    TBA

    Take the Nelson-Denny pre-test and post-test.  Show improvement on the post-test.

     

     

    Throughout the semester

     

    Complete daily work, homework, and quizzes. Attend classes daily for brief writing assignments and discussions about course material.

     

    Throughout the semester

     

    Read six short stories, complete objective tests, quizzes and short writings, attend the metacognition lab, review metacognitive strategies for reading and writing critically, and participate in class discussions.

     

    Throughout the semester

     

     

    March 2-6

    May 4-6

    Throughout the semester

     

    B. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of how to write essays of at least five paragraphs that include thesis statements, well-developed body paragraphs, and conclusions.  

    1. Midterm Assessment

    2. Final Assessment

    Produce multiple drafts of a descriptive essay, narrative, and definition essay that include titles, introductions, topic sentences, body paragraphs, and conclusions.

     

     

     

     

    Throughout the semester

     

     

    March 2-6

     

    C. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of how to take a midterm and final examination to show evidence of reading and understanding articles, essays, and short stories.

     1. Midterm exam: Students take the midterm examination.

     

    Throughout the semester

     

    Give an oral presentation based on a revised writing assignment. 

     

    May 4-6

    2. Final exam: Students take the final examination.

     

     

    OER Course Content and Calendar:

    Classes Begin: January 19, 2021

      

    Weeks & Course Learning Outcomes

    Readings, Media & Resources

    Activities & Assessments

    Week 1: (SLO A-C)

    • Class Orientation: Discussion of Objectives, Philosophy, Calendar  
    • Class Policies, WAM Writing Assignments, Research, Portfolio
    • Discussion of Sample Essay
    • Workshop on writing: mechanics, grammar, punctuation, organization

     

     

     

    OER:

    • Writing for Success: https://open.lib.umn.edu/writingforsuccess/ Chapters 1-5 covers the basics of grammar, punctuation, sentence… from the writing process and mechanics to rhetorical modes and the research paper.
    • Lumen-English Composition I-The Writing Process:

    https://courses.lumenlearning.com/engcomp1-wmopen/chapter/text-lower-order-concerns/

    Lower Order Concerns | English Composition I Grammar, Thesis statement. Punctuation. Organization. Citation. Focus ...Consider individual sentences in terms of grammar, mechanics, and punctuation.

     

    Reading:

     

    Video & Media:

     

    Assignments: Class Orientation: Discussion of Objectives, Philosophy, Calendar, Class Policies, WAM Writing Assignments, Research, Portfolio;  Discussion of Sample Essay

     

    Complete at least 15-minutes of reading during the week (D.E.A.R.)   

     

    Begin Writing Assignment-Narrative Essay: Write a five-paragraph narrative essay. Describe three events that have happened to you in your life that have not happened to anyone else. These three events will be unique to you. This assignment is due Week 4. 

     

    Week 2: (SLO A-C)

    • Thesis Statements
    • Learning about the Narrative Essay 
    • Learning about Punctuation

     

     

     

    OER:

    Link to Learning. Sandra Cisneros offers an example of a narrative essay in “Only Daughter” that captures her sense of her Chicana-Mexican heritage as the only ...

     

    Reading:

     

    Video & Media:

     

     

     

    Assignments: 

    • Read- The Lesson" by Toni Cade Bambara
    •  
    • Read about the following topics in recommended OERs:
      • Prewriting, The Thesis Statement, Narration, and A Concise Guide to Punctuation.

                                     

    Week 3: (SLO A-C)

    • Body Paragraphs
    • Mechanics
    • Narrative Essay topics

     

    OER:

    It includes chapters on paragraph structure, the writing process, rhetorical ... of writing: grammar, sentence construction, paragraph development, essays, research. ... "A good paragraph contains three distinct components: a topic sentence, body, ... the writing process and addresses mechanical and grammatical concerns.

     

    Reading:

     

    Video & Media:

     

    Assignments:

    Read: Alice Walker, “Everyday Use”

     

    • Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: The Body Paragraphs and

    A Concise Guide to Mechanics

     

    In-Class Discussion of Weekly Assignment

    Week 4: (SLO A-C)

    • Introductions and Conclusions
    • Narrative Essays

     

    OER:

    Try opening the essay with an event that is interesting to introduce the story and
    get it going. Finally, your conclusion should help resolve the central conflict of ...

     

    Reading:

     

    Video & Media:

     

    Assignments:

      •  Read: "Thank You, Ma'am" by Langston Hughes
        •  
        • Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: Beginnings and Endings; Description 
    •  
    • Submit your Narrative Essay by posting your essay in the Discussion Board--Week 4

     

    Week 5: (SLO A-C)

    • Drafting and Revising

     

    OER:

     

    Reading:

     

    Video & Media:

     

    Assignments:

      • "The Gilded Six-Bits" by  Zora Neale Hurston
         
        • Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: Drafting and Revising: Creative Thinking and Critical Thinking 
    •  
    • Check out the descriptive essay PPT in the "Lectures" folder. 

     

    Week 6: (SLO A-C)

    • Effective Sentences

     

    OER:

     

     

    Reading:

     

    Video & Media:

     

    Assignments:

    "Battle Royal" by Ralph Ellison
     

    • Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: Effective Sentences 

     

    Week 7: (SLO A-C)

    • Word Logic 

     

    OER:

     

     

    Reading:

     

    Assignments:

    Read the following: "The Man Who Was Almost a Man" by Richard Wright

      • Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: Word Logic 

     

    Week 8: (SLO A-C)

    • The Reading-Writing Connection 
    • Writing about literature

     

    OER:

     

     

     

     

    Assignments:

    • Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: The Reading-Writing Connection 
    •  
    • Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: Writing about Literature” 

     

    Week 9: (SLO A-C)

    • Dystopian Writing
    • The Definition Essay

     

    OER:

     

    Assignments:

    • Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: Writing Essays Using Multiple Strategies; Writing a Definition  

     

    Week 10: (SLO A-C)

    • Dystopian Literature
    • The Definition Essay
    • Writing Workshops

     

    OER:

     

    Reading:

    • Open the "Required Reading" folder and read the sample definition essay to get a better sense of what one of these looks like. 

     

    Video & Media:

     

    Assignments:

    • Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: Dystopian Literature; Definition Essay
    •  
    • Go to the "Lecture" folder and review the video on Definition Essays. 
    •  
    • Open the "Required Reading" folder and read the sample definition essay to get a better sense of what one of these looks like. 
    •  
    • Go to the "Assignments" folder to view the Definition Essay assignments. 
    •  
    • This week we will also start our writing workshops!

     

    Week 11: (SLO A-C)

    • Dystopian Literature
    • The Definition Essay
    • Writing Workshops

     

    OER:

     

    Assignments:

    Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: Dystopian Literature; Definition Essay

     

    You will submit your essay outline this week under the appropriate assignment in the "assignments" folder. 

     

    We will continue our essay revisions and writing workshops.

     

    Week 12: (SLO A-C)

    • Dystopian Literature
    • The Description Essay
    • Writing Workshops

     

    OER:

     

     

    Assignments:

    Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: Dystopian Literature; Definition Essay

    •  
    • We will continue our essay revisions and our Writing Workshops. 

     

    Week 13: (SLO A-C)

    • Dystopian Literature
    • The Description Essay
    • Writing Workshops

     

    OER:

     

     

     

     

     

    Assignments:

    Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: Dystopian Literature; Definition Essay

    •  
    • We will continue our essay revisions and our Writing Workshops

     

    Week 14: (SLO A-C)

    • Dystopian Literature
    • The Description Essay
    • Writing Workshops

     

    OER:

     

    Assignments:

    Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: Dystopian Literature; Definition Essay

    •  
    • We will continue our essay revisions and our Writing Workshops

     

    Week 15: (SLO A-C)

    • Dystopian literature
    • The Definition Essay
    • Writing Workshops

     

    OER:

     

     

    Assignments:

    Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: Dystopian Literature; Definition Essay

    •  
    • You will be submitting your Definition Essay

     

    Week 16: (SLO A-C)

    • Essay Writing

    OER:

     

     

     

    Assignments:

    Read about the following topics in recommended OERs: Essay Writing

     

    • Final Exam essay.

     

    Writing Assignment: Write a five-paragraph definition essay in which you analyze one of the stories, novels, or films we have discussed. Identify three major themes in the story, novel, or film and incorporate these ideas in your thesis. 

     

     

    College and Classroom Requirements:

    Reading/Writing/Speaking:

    Ability in reading, writing, and speaking is measured in all courses at Miles College.  Scoring guides or rubrics are used to assess these outcomes.  Candidates will be provided copies of the rubrics. All written work must be completed using a word processor. Candidates are expected to follow the scoring guide or rubric to submit any written assignment or make any class presentation. All written assignments must be typed; no handwritten assignments will be accepted. Attendance and Participation Statement:

    Poor attendance in virtual classes will negatively impact a student’s overall course grade because class discussions and participation are a required part of the final grade. Class participation and completion of Weekly Assignments are REQUIRED. Also, completion of Midterm and Final Essays and Midterm and Final Exams are mandatory.

    Cheating:

    There is a no-tolerance attitude for cheating in this class.  Any candidate/student caught cheating will automatically receive an F for the test, activity, or assignment.

    Cheating, Plagiarism, and Academic Dishonesty:

    All work for any course at Miles College must be your own work, generated exclusively for one particular class. All sources must be properly documented. Plagiarism is defined as the following:

    1) Using the exact word of another person’s work/writing without acknowledgment of your source through the use of quotation marks and correct citation/documentation.

    2) Rephrasing a passage by another writer without giving proper credit.

    3) Using someone else’s facts or ideas without acknowledgment.

    4) Using a piece of writing for one course that was already used in a previous course (on in courses in which you are simultaneously enrolled) without express permission from both instructors to do so.

    5) Presenting fabricated or falsified citations or materials.

    Cheating on exams is also an affront to the principle of academic honesty. Suspected plagiarism/cheating will result in severe consequences; see the Student Handbook for the penalties of cheating or plagiarism. Additionally, students suspected of plagiarism/cheating will be reported to the Humanities Division Chair and the Academic Dean.    

          (See College Catalog/Student Handbook for additional information.)

     

    ONE VOICE” STATEMENT (Class Conduct)

    Students will be expected to follow the guidelines of the Humanities Division “One Voice” discipline policy. This includes, but is not limited to, a zero tolerance of disrespect of faculty, no cell phone use in the classroom, tardiness, sleeping in class, or plagiarism, and being prepared, following the dress code, and learning the cultural differences between high school and college.

    The time we spend in our virtual classroom is devoted to our class. Our behavior should show respect and consideration for everyone present. Blackboard keeps a record of student attendance for virtual classes. All classes are recorded and can be accessed through Blackboard Classroom Ultra.

     

    NELSON-DENNY READING TEST

    The Nelson-Denny Reading Test is a standardized reading test that measures the reading ability of high school and college students. The Nelson-Denny includes two parts: Vocabulary and Comprehension. The first part of the test, Vocabulary, is made up of 80-100 multiple-choice items, each with five response options. The time allowed for this part of the exam is 15 minutes. The second part, Comprehension, requires students to read 5-8 passages and to respond to 36-38 multiple-choice questions based on the content of those passages. The time allowed for this part of the exam is 20 minutes (http://www.molloy.edu/admissions/freshmen-admissions/faq-nelson-denny-reading-test).

     

    D.E.A.R.

    D.E.A.R. is classroom time set aside for teachers and students to Drop Everything and Read. The goal of D.E.A.R. is to encourage independent silent reading for extended periods of time on a daily or weekly basis. Students choose the book they wish to read based on interest and ability (http://www.learnnc.org/reference/Drop+Everything+and+Read).

     

    Online CLASS ACTIVITIES

    The syllabus and all class content will be available on Blackboard. Click on Discussions in the left hand column of Blackboard to see Weekly Assignments. Click on Student Center in the left hand column of Blackboard to see the link for Blackboard Classroom Ultra to join classroom sessions. Blackboard keeps a record of student attendance for virtual classes. All classes are recorded and can be accessed through Blackboard Classroom Ultra.

     

    MARSI

    The Metacognitive Awareness of Reading Strategies Inventory (MARSI) was developed by educational researchers Mokhtari and Reichard (2002). This survey lists 30 different strategies readers use to make sense of texts, and it asks students to rate the frequency with which they use these strategies in academic reading, along a 5-point scale from 1 (Never) to 5 (Always). Student responses are grouped into average scores for three areas – Global Reading Strategies, Support Reading Strategies, and Problem-Solving Strategies, along with an overall score. The scoring scale: High = 3.5 and up, Medium = 2.5-3.4, Low = 2.4 and below (https://www.chabotcollege.edu/learningconnection/ctl/FIGs/jumpstart/readingassmt.asp).

     

    QEP

    In order to improve the collegiate experience at Miles College, the QEP (Quality Enhancement Plan) will focus on the reading skills of students across the curriculum through content-based reading instruction. Our QEP is “Enhancing Reading Through Metacognition.” Metacognition is thinking about thinking (Read, think, read). QEP learning outcomes include the following: Students will demonstrate improvements in reading comprehension; Students will demonstrate the ability to think and analyze critically; Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of their learning and study strategies. For questions, email QEP@miles.edu. You may go online for more information about QEP: Facebook: MILES QUALITY ENHANCEMENT PLAN (QEP); Twitter: @MILESCOLLEGEQEP; and Instagram: MILESCOLLEGE_QEP.

    Special Accommodations / Disabilities:

    Miles College complies with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 state the qualities students with disabilities who meet the essential functions and academic requirements are entitled to research accommodations. It is the student’s responsibility to request services through Special Accommodations Services for each semester in which he/she is requesting accommodations. Please contact the ADA representative, Mr. Edgar Lamar at 205-929-1000.

     

    Statement on Discrimination and Harassment

    Miles College is committed to providing both employment and educational environments free of harassment or discrimination related to an individual’s race, color, gender, religion, national origin, age, or disability.  Any practice or behavior that constitutes harassment is a violation of Miles College's policies and will not be tolerated.

     

    How to succeed in this course:

    To do well in this course, you must keep up with the reading selections.  Take good notes, and come to class prepared to ask questions and raise issues about the reading that interested or puzzled you.  Read each selection until you have some understanding of what the piece is about.  Look up unfamiliar words in the dictionary.  Merely listening and/or taking notes is not necessarily thinking.  As the class depends upon discussions, your participation is necessary, even mandatory, and to participate intelligently, you must come to class prepared—i.e., you must have read carefully the assigned material. Click on Student Center in the left-hand column of Blackboard to see the link for Blackboard Classroom Ultra to join classroom sessions. Blackboard keeps a record of student attendance for virtual classes. All classes are recorded and can be accessed through Blackboard Classroom Ultra even after the class is over.

     

    Metacognition Learning Lab

    The Metacognition Learning Lab, located in room 207 in Pearson Hall, is a wonderful resource for students. For questions call the lab at 929-1607. The staff does not proofread papers for you, but they can help with the overall structure, organization, development, and mechanics. Take a copy of the writing assignment sheet and any work you’ve completed toward the assignment when you visit the lab. 

     

    Class Contacts

    If you miss class, it is your responsibility to contact classmates to find out homework instructions and what we did that day in class. Please do not email or call me to find out what we did in class. Click on Student Center in the left-hand column of Blackboard to see the link for Blackboard Classroom Ultra to join classroom sessions. Blackboard keeps a record of student attendance for virtual classes. All classes are recorded and can be accessed through Blackboard Classroom Ultra even after the class is over.

     

    List the names, email addresses, and phone numbers of two classmates.

    1.  __________________________________________________________________________ 

     

    2. __________________________________________________________________________

     

    3. __________________________________________________________________________

     

     

    Five Paragraph Essay Rubric

     

    Name___________________________________   Course_________                                   Date______________

     

    Trait

    Excellent: 50--45

    Good:  44--40

    Fair:  39—35

    Poor: 34--0

     Points

    Content, Ideas & Development 50 points (50%)

    (Context: where/how readers will encounter the work; speech, video, web, etc.)

    The paper holds attention.  It follows the assignment, states major points clearly, and supports them with specific details.  Purpose, context, and intended audience are clear.  The source material used well.

    The Paper states major points clearly and conforms to the assignment. It may need more support, clarity, or attention to context.  Sources used fairly well. 

    Paper makes major points but needs more support.  The Paper may be slightly off-topic or boring. Awareness of context, audience, and purpose is missing or inconsistent.  Source use presents problems. 

    The Paper is incomplete or severely off-topic. It lacks major points, support, or attention to audience and purpose. Sources are used badly.

     

    30% pointsà

    Excellent: 30--27

    Good: 26--24

    Fair:  23--21

    Poor: 20--0

    ß 30%

    Organization and Structure

    30 points

    (30%)

    Thesis is clear. The form and structure of the paper are easy to follow.  Paragraph transitions are logical, and the conclusion flows from the body. The Paper is quick to read.

    Thesis is clear and structure is fairly consistent, and the conclusion is logical. Paragraphs have transitions but may lack order and/or unity.

    Thesis is flawed.  The paper has some order, but paragraphs lack order, clarity, and/or transitions. The conclusion is weak or missing.  Parts of the paper may need rewriting.

    Lack of thesis organization, and structure take away from the message. Paragraphs are not logical.

     

    10% Pointsà

    Excellent: 10--9

    Good:  8

    Fair: 7

    Poor: 6--0

    ß10%

    Format

    10 points

    (10%)

    The Paper follows MLA guidelines.  It is the appropriate length and almost error-free.  The source material is documented correctly.

    The Paper follows most of the guidelines.  The source material is not always well documented. A few elements are wrong.

    Paper is over or under word length.  It follows some but not all of the guidelines.  Documentation is sloppy.

    The Paper is not double spaced. Length, documentation, and/or format are wrong.

     

    Grammar, Punctuation, and spelling

    10 points

    (10%)

    Sentences are clear and the language is precise.  Paper follows rules of grammar, usage, and punctuation. The spelling is correct.  Editing is unnecessary.

    Sentences are sometimes unclear, but most rules of grammar, usage, and punctuation are followed.  The paper needs light editing.

    Language is unclear and/or paper contains slang.  Errors in grammar, usage, punctuation, and spelling make the paper need moderate editing.

    Syntax and other errors interfere with the reading. The paper needs extensive editing/rewriting.

     

     

    Total Essay Points: ___________

     

    Rubric for an Oral Presentation

     

    Name: _________________________________ Course: _________Date:_________

     

    Topic: _______________________________________________________________

     

     

     

     

     

    1

     

    2

     

    3

     

    4

     

    Total

     

     

     

    Organization

     

     

     

    The audience cannot understand the presentation because there is no sequence of information.

    The audience has difficulty following presentation because student jumps around.

    The student presents in a logical order which the audience can follow.

    The student presents in a logical, interesting sequence which audience can follow.

     

     

    Subject Knowledge

     

     

    The student does not understand information.

    The student is uncomfortable with information.

    The student answers questions briefly.

    The student answers all questions completely.

     

     

    Graphics

     

     

    Student uses no visuals.

    Visuals rarely relate to presentation.

    Student’s visuals relate to presentation.

    Student’s visuals explain and reinforce the presentation.

     

     

    Eye Contact

     

     

    The student has no eye contact.

    Student occasionally uses eye contact.

    The student usually maintains eye contact.

    Student maintains eye contact with the audience.

     

     

    Elocution

     

    Student mumbles and/or speaks too quietly for students in the back of class to hear.

    Student’s voice is low. Audience members have difficulty hearing presentation.

    The student’s voice is clear. Most of the audience can hear.

    Student uses a clear voice and precise pronunciation. All audience members can hear.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Total Points: