What is Public Policy?

Introduction

Cornerstone of the Texas Public Policy Foundation in Austin, Texas
Figure 11.1 The Texas Public Policy Foundation in Austin, Texas. The Texas Public Policy Foundation is a 501(c)3 non-profit research institute that was created to "promote and defend liberty, personal responsibility, and free enterprise in Texas and the nation by educating and affecting policymakers and the Texas public policy debate with academically sound research and outreach." Image credit: Robyn License: CC BY

It is easy to imagine that when designers engineer a product, like a car, they do so with the intent of satisfying the consumer. But the design of any complicated product must take into account the needs of regulators, transporters, assembly line workers, parts suppliers, and myriad other participants in the manufacture and shipment process. And manufacturers must also be aware that consumer tastes are fickle: A gas-guzzling sports car may appeal to an unmarried twenty- something with no children; but what happens to product satisfaction when gas prices fluctuate, or the individual gets married and has children?

In many ways, the process of designing policy isn’t that much dierent. The government, just like auto companies, needs to ensure that its citizen-consumers have access to an array of goods and services. And just as in auto companies, a wide range of actors is engaged in figuring out how to do it. Sometimes, this process eectively provides policies that benefit citizens. But just as often, the process of policymaking is muddied by the demands of competing interests with dierent opinions about society’s needs or the role that government should play in meeting them. To understand why, we begin by thinking about what we mean by the term “public policy.”